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European Instrument For Democracy and Human Rights (EIDHR): 2017 Global Call for Proposals - EuropeAid/155232/DH/ACT/Multi
Deadline: 09 Nov 2017   CALL EXPIRED

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Proposals

Background

The European Instrument for Democracy and Human Rights (EIDHR) is a European Union programme that aims to promote democracy and human rights worldwide through support to civil society initiatives. The EIDHR was adopted by the European Parliament and the Council in March 2014 (Regulation No. 235/2014) for the period 2014-2020 by replacing and building upon the EIDHR (2007-2013) and the European Initiative for Democracy and Human Rights (2000-2006). 

This instrument is designed to support civil society to become an effective force for political reform and defence of human rights. In doing this, it complements the geographical programmes, which focus on public institution-building. The EIDHR offers independence of action, which is a critical feature of cooperation with civil society organisations at national level, especially in the sensitive areas of democracy and human rights. It offers a great flexibility and an increased capacity to respond to changing circumstances or to support innovation. The EIDHR has considerable independence of action since it does not need the consent of the governments of the countries concerned for the financing of activities.

The EIDHR is global in scope. It operates at national, regional and international levels and supports actions carried out in third countries outside the European Union, throughout the world. The EIDHR regulation defines five main objectives:

1) Support to Human Rights and Human Rights Defenders in situations where they are most at risk;

2) Support to other EU Human Rights Priorities with main focus on protecting human dignity including abolition of the death penalty, eradication of torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, support to a comprehensive approach to rehabilitation and prevention activities, protection and promotion of children's rights, protection of women's rights, fighting discrimination in all its forms, fighting against impunity, promotion and protection of freedom of religion or belief, promotion of economic, social and cultural rights, promotion of the respect for international humanitarian law;

3) Support to Democracy;

4) Support to EU Election Observation Missions;

5) Support to targeted key actors and processes, including international and regional human rights instruments and mechanisms.

Over the past 2 years, the annual EIDHR Global Call for Proposals has covered core priority themes in the form of five separated lots: 

 (i) Human rights and their defenders where they are the most at risk;

(ii) Economic, Social and Cultural rights; 

(iii) Human Dignity;

(iv) Anti-discrimination;

(v) Other priorities planned in the multiannual programming or linked to new unforeseen areas.

 

Objectives of the programme and priority issues 

The general objective of this call for proposals is to support civil society in its actions to support the protection and the promotion of human rights and fundamental freedoms worldwide.

This call for proposals is fully in line with the European Consensus on Development, the EU's response to the UN 2030 agenda for sustainable development. The recently adopted European Consensus sets out in an integrated manner the main principles which will guide the approach of the EU and the Member States to cooperation with developing countries over the next 15 years, as well as a strategy for reaching the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The Consensus reiterates the EU and its Members states commitment to the principles of EU external action, set out in Article 21(1) of the TEU: democracy, the rule of law, the universality and indivisibility of human rights and fundamental freedoms, respect for human dignity, the principles of equality and solidarity, and respect for the principles of the United Nations Charter and international law. 

The specific objectives of this call for proposals are to support civil society and human rights defenders working outside the EU in five key areas of human rights corresponding to the five recurring lots of 2014-2017 EIDHR global calls for proposals: 

Lot 1: Supporting Human Rights Defenders in the area of land-related rights, indigenous peoples, in the context of inter alia 'land grabbing' and climate change.

Lot 2: Fighting against extrajudicial killings and enforced disappearances.

Lot 3: Combating forced labour and modern slavery.

Lot 4: Promoting and supporting the rights of persons with disabilities.

Lot 5: Supporting freedom of religion or belief.

The definition of the objectives of each of the lots of this call for proposals has been subject to an exchange of views with civil society organisations through the Brussels based networks on 20th of April 2017 in Brussels. The outcome of this exchange is published on EuropeAid's website.  

Overarching and working principles 

The objectives of this call are aligned with the European Consensus on Development as well as the EU's priorities as identified in policies and regulations, notably the EU Action Plan on Human Rights and Democracy 2015-2019 as well as in the specific human rights guidelines adopted by the EU. 

The European Consensus on Development commits the EU and its Member States to implementing a rights-based approach (RBA) to development cooperation, encompassing all human rights. It thereby reinforces the EU's commitment to an RBA as outlined in the 2012 EU Strategic Framework on Human Rights and Democracy, the 2014 Tool-box ", a Rights-Based Approach, encompassing all human rights, for EU development cooperation" and the respective Council Conclusions. In addition, the EIDHR Regulation stipulates that in its implementation, the EU shall apply a Rights-Based Approach (RBA) encompassing all human rights, whether civil, political, economic, social or cultural. Therefore, all proposals under all lots of this call for proposals shall be designed according to a Rights-Based Approach. Please note that this will be assessed in the Evaluation Grid of the Concept Note under question 1.2 and under questions (3.1, 3.2 and 3.3) related to the effectiveness and feasibility of the action in the Full Application Evaluation Grid.  

The RBA is a working methodology based on internationally recognised human rights and is directed to promoting and protecting human rights in practice. A RBA integrates the norms, standards and principles of international human rights law into the plans, policies and processes of development programmes and projects and applies to all sectors, all modalities, and each step of the project cycle – identification, formulation, implementation, monitoring and evaluation. 

The RBA implies that target groups are considered as ‘rights-holders’ with legal entitlements, and government institutions are not mere service providers but ‘duty-bearers,’ who are under an obligation to deliver on people’s human rights. In line with a Rights-Based Approach, development cooperation should contribute to the development of the capacities of ‘rights-holders’ to claim their rights and ‘duty-bearers’ to meet their obligations. Programmes and projects therefore need to assess the capacities of rights-holders and duty-bearers and develop the appropriate strategies to build these capacities. At the heart of the RBA is the recognition that unequal power relations and social exclusion deny people their human rights and often keep them in poverty. The approach therefore puts strong emphasis on marginalised, disadvantaged, and excluded groups. 

The RBA methodology also reminds us that development projects can have unintended negative impact in terms of human rights such as disadvantaging certain groups, interfering with participation rights and labour rights or contributing to forced displacement. It is therefore important to abide by the 'do no harm' principle and carry out the required analysis and mitigation. 

Moreover, the RBA working methodology recognises that pursuing desired human rights outcomes is not, in itself, enough. The way these outcomes are achieved is equally important. Programmes therefore monitor and evaluate both outcomes and processes.

Please see section 2.1.4 "Eligible actions: actions for which an application may be made" for additional information on the Right-Based Approach methodology. 

Please find additional links to useful reference documents: 

The UN Statement of Common Understanding on Human Rights-Based Approaches to Development Cooperation and Programming (the Common Understanding) adopted by the United Nations Development Group (UNDG) in 2003;

OHCHR Human Rights Based Approach Frequently Asked Questions 

Cross-cutting elements

In the paragraph below, important elements are highlighted in order to guide you in the drafting process of your proposal, whenever relevant for the specific actions foreseen. Therefore, the whole list of issues/elements highlighted should not necessarily be integrated in your proposal. The selection procedure will evaluate proposals in their entirety depending on the context of the activities proposed and on the target groups and final beneficiaries/rights holders identified.  These added value elements should be reflected in the Concept Note under section 1.2.3 and 1.2.4 and in the Full Proposal under section 2.1.1 and 2.1.2. 

The proposals shall tackle, whenever relevant, inter-sectoral discriminations based on e.g. ethnicity, disability, age, gender identity and/or sexual orientation. In particular, attention should be given to actions empowering the most marginalised and vulnerable groups (indigenous peoples, migrants, refugees, cultural minorities, non-skilled workers, children etc.) as well as taking into account the different risks and challenges that may be faced by women and men. In addition, proposals should whenever relevant include conflict sensitivity. Focus on the needs and challenges faced by targeted groups/rights-holders living outside the capitals and in remote areas, and/or encourage the constitution and capacity-building of networks of local organisations and implementing actors, including at regional level should also be taken into account. 

Furthermore, it is important that any organisation or group that works with children or young people has a clear set of guidelines about how they will keep children safe and to respond to child protection concerns. Therefore, applicants and co-applicants working directly with or for children should demonstrate in their proposals that a child protection policy is in place for any project activities that involve interactions with children. 

Priority will be given to proposals submitted by local organisations or by regional networks/platforms of local organisations established in one of the countries where the action will take place as lead applicants (this aspect will be taken into consideration for the assessment of section 1.1 of the Concept note evaluation grid and sections 3.1, 3.2, 3.3 and 3.4 of the full application grid). 

 

Geographical balance will be taken into account by the Evaluation Committee at any stage of the technical evaluation.

 

LOT 1: Supporting Human Rights Defenders in the area of land-related rights, indigenous peoples, in the context of inter alia 'land grabbing' and climate change.

 

Support for human rights defenders is one of the major priorities of the EU's external human rights policy and goes hand in hand with dedicated financial assistance granted under the EIDHR. Indeed, support for human rights defenders is a priority of the EIDHR Regulation and a strong objective of the EIDHR Multiannual programming for 2014-2017. 

 

The support foreseen under Lot 1 is also fully in line with UN Resolution 70/161 of 17 December 2015 and the March 2016 Human Rights Council Resolution 31/32 on protecting defenders addressing economic, social and cultural rights. These Resolutions recognise the vital work of human rights defenders in promoting, protecting and advocating the realisation of economic, social and cultural rights, express concerns that threats and attacks against them as well as hindrance of their works have a negative impact on the realisation of those rights, including rights which relate to environmental and land issues. They moreover express grave concern also at the observations and findings of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders addressing environmental and land issues and corporate responsibility. The March 2016 Resolution reaffirms the urgent need to respect, facilitate and promote the work of promoting and defending those rights, as a vital factor contributing towards their realisation, including when they relate to environmental and land issues. 

 

Land-related rights and environmental issues (including biodiversity and climate) are enshrined in several international documents setting up international standards, such as the ILO Convention 169, the Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forest (VGGT), the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), the UN Guiding Principles on business and human rights, the UN Guidelines on Forced Evictions, the 2003 Common Understanding on Human rights-based approaches as well as being key elements of several EU commitments such as the EU Human Rights Defenders guidelines, the EU Regulation on “conflict minerals”, the EU commitments regarding trade agreements to require partner governments to protect human rights, labour rights and the environment and regarding the reduction of deforestation through the Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (FLEGT) scheme.

 

Land and natural resources management is one of the most critical challenges the world faces today. Increasing competition over diminishing renewable resources, such as land and water, are on the rise. Furthermore, about 75% of the land worldwide is not legally documented, with negative repercussions for the poor and loss of opportunities for sustainable development, in particular for women. Conflicts over the rights to land and natural resources multiply and regrettably imply increasing repressions of land and environmental rights defenders. Repressions take various forms aiming at discouraging, discrediting and disrupting their non-violent activities. Smear, defamation, criminalisation and stigmatisation campaigns are widely used. There is a serious worry worldwide on the growing number of killings and violence perpetrated both by State and non-State actors towards activists who expose or oppose environmental destruction or land-grabbing, both being interlinked and often inseparable, in particular those activists who are living in remote area such as indigenous peoples' leaders and community members. In 2016, almost 50% of defenders reported murdered in 25 countries were working to defend land, indigenous and environmental rights. In 2015 and 2016, almost 50% of the documented cases of attacks against human rights defenders working on corporate accountability issues were linked to indigenous peoples, community members or environmental activists opposing business interests in the areas of land rights and/or climate & environmental concerns. 

 

The general objective of Lot 1 is to support, protect and enable Human Rights Defenders (HRDs) and HRDs organisations that are working on land and other natural resources-related rights (waters, subsoil, forest, extractives, etc.) including in context of ‘land grabbing’ , climate change and/or indigenous peoples' .rights.

 

The specific objectives of Lot 1 are:

to reinforce the short and long-term capacities of these HRDs and HRDs' organisations to do their work on environmental and land issues at local/national level, to take their cases to the relevant national, regional or international human rights bodies and mechanisms and to apply internationally recognised frameworks, safeguards and guidelines in the defence of land and environment, including with respect to exercising their right to due diligence and Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC); and/or

to reinforce their resilience capacities to face severe repression through defamation, smear and stigmatisation at different level, community and public opinion, with a strong gender perspective; and/or   

to support their engagement with State and non-State actors (notably leading responsible business associations and investors) through dialogues and mediation activities to ensure the respect of their rights, and to overcome impunity and the lack of access to remedy for victims.

 

For the purpose of this call, actions should focus on at least one of the specific objectives mentioned above.

 

Indicative and non-exhaustive list of activities for Lot 1: 

 

Development of integrated protection systems that entail not only the physical protection of HRDs at risk but also measures that support their wellbeing, comprising psycho-social support and access to health services when needed; development of appropriate preventive capabilities and enhanced preparedness of local civil society organisations, including indigenous peoples’ organisations to provide the protection against violations and abuses of human rights and fundamental freedoms;

Provision of medical and psycho-social assistance, legal counselling and any other type of support, including to those placed in detention or in prison as well as to their relatives;

Temporary relocation for those who are threatened or in danger (including their family);

Promoting and supporting networking, coordination and cooperation at all levels to break the isolation of HRDs acting in the most difficult situations and remote areas;

Building capacities of networks facilitating access to international support and regional human rights mechanisms, enhancing their participation to public dialogue as well as improving their visibility in local, national, regional and international fora and regional events;

Strengthening capacities and role e.g. through improving the availability of resources and opportunities in order to decrease their vulnerability, such as trainings on risk analysis and the formulation of security plans; access to tools for increasing their capacity to face intimidation and harassment (including digital security tools); access to resources in matters of legal defence; improved technical, management, material and financial capacities; training on security and protection, including the provision of relevant material and equipment, as well as any other type of preventive activities;

Activities aiming at developing communication strategies, awareness raising and using (social) media with the aim to counter negative narrative against Human Rights Defenders and to gain social recognition at different level, familial, community to public opinion  as well as to overcome criminalisation and defamation and promote land and environmental rights;

Training and awareness-building on international law standards as well as of international, regional and national mechanisms for the protection of HRDs; 

Training and capacity-building on negotiation, advocacy, lobbying, litigation, strategies of change, researching, access to information, monitoring, documenting and reporting about widespread and systematic violations of land-related rights, indigenous peoples, in the context of inter alia 'land grabbing' and climate change, and impunity;

Supporting the participation of HRDs as accountability agents in legislative and policy-making processes at all levels; including witness protection in cases unveiling human rights abuses in context of Land and environmental issues, when the state is unable to ensure protection.

Supporting activities to track business conduct, rewarding good practice, identifying opportunities to work with other actors and leading responsible business associations and investors, to leverage and replicate these opportunities; 

Supporting activities to overcome the lack of access to remedy, focusing on reducing impunity and improving avenues to access to remedy, both judicial and non-judicial mechanisms;    

Monitoring and international investigation on human rights violations related to land and environment, including fact finding missions; supporting research activities; supporting sustainable litigation processes in financing parts of those processes (building evidence/witnesses/etc.);

Supporting dialogues and mediation activities in most difficult situations, in particular regarding issues concerning remote areas through independent, innovative and inclusive set up;

Building capacities for the prevention, mitigation as well as mediation of conflicts related to land and environment, notably including through the establishment of consultation mechanisms with the view to ensure the free, prior, informed consent of indigenous peoples concerned on land tenure and environment related issues.

 

 

LOT 2: Fighting against extrajudicial killings and enforced disappearances.

In recent years, a growing number of States have been involved in accusations and legal cases related to or for having reverted to extrajudicial, targeted killings, having been complacent or having shown tolerance for summary executions. The justification often brought forward has been that these extrajudicial killings and enforced disappearances come in as response to terrorism or security threats, asymmetric warfare in the context of internal unrest, widespread organised or symptomatic violence, internal/international conflicts, the so-called war on drugs or other kinds of trafficking. In addition, many cases of enforced disappearances remain unsolved, unpunished or even unreported.

For the purpose of this call for proposals, the definition of extrajudicial killings, is guided by what is stipulated in the UN Model questionnaire of the Special Rapporteur on Extrajudicial, Summary or Arbitrary Executions and Article 6 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights: 

 

Violations of the right to life in connection with the death penalty. When capital punishment is imposed after an unfair trial, or in case of a breach of the right to appeal or the right to seek pardon or commutation of sentence. If the convicted is a minor, a mentally ill or insane person, a pregnant woman or a recent mother; 

Death threats and fear of imminent extrajudicial executions by state officials, paramilitary groups, private individuals or groups cooperating with or tolerated by the Government, as well as unidentified persons who may be linked to the categories mentioned above; 

Deaths in custody owing to torture, neglect or the use of force, or life-threatening conditions of detention;

Deaths owing to the use of force by law enforcement officials, or persons acting in direct or indirect compliance with the State, when the use of force is inconsistent with the criteria of absolute necessity and proportionality;

Deaths owing to attacks by security forces of the State, by paramilitary groups, death squads or other private forces cooperating with or tolerated by the Government or acting individually;

Violations of the right to life during armed conflicts, especially of the civilian population, contrary to humanitarian law;

Expulsion or refoulement of persons to a country where their lives are in danger;

Genocide;

Breach of the obligation to investigate alleged violations of the right to life and to bring those responsible to justice;

Breach of the obligation to provide adequate compensation to victims of violations of the right to life.

This call for proposals addresses all the above cases of extrajudicial killings from (b) to (j). It does not cover (a) since the EIDHR focused on the fight against death penalty in its 2015 global call for proposals.

 

For the purpose of this call for proposals, enforced disappearances shall be defined according to Article 2 of the UN Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance, which reads: "… enforced disappearance" is considered to be the arrest, detention, abduction or any other form of deprivation of liberty by agents of the State or by persons or groups of persons acting with the authorization, support or acquiescence of the State, followed by a refusal to acknowledge the deprivation of liberty or by concealment of the fate or whereabouts of the disappeared person, which place such a person outside the protection of the law.”  All other applicable international and regional human rights instruments and existing jurisprudence can also be referred to as the wider normative framework of all actions supported under this call.

For both issues (extrajudicial killings and enforced disappearances), perpetrators of these acts can be State or non-State actors, such as private security bodies, guerrillas, etc. 

The general objective of Lot 2 is to fight against extrajudicial killings and enforced disappearances.

The specific objectives of Lot 2 are:

to support projects dealing with prevention of enforced disappearances and extrajudicial killings; and/or

to support projects promoting accountability for perpetrators and the search for remedy for victims and their families in cases of enforced disappearances and/or extrajudicial killings.

 

For the purpose of this call, actions should focus on at least one of the specific objectives mentioned above, although actions are encouraged to find the interrelation or interdependence between prevention and accountability. 

Actions can also make links between extrajudicial killings and enforced disappearances, and torture, cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment and the death penalty, as stipulated in the "Guidelines to EU policy towards non-EU countries and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment", and the "EU Guidelines on Death Penalty". 

Actions may address situations of extrajudicial killings and enforced disappearances linked to external or internal conflicts, high levels of security threats, the fight against terrorism, the so-called war on drugs and/or the fight on organised crime, migration management, transitional justice processes, and/or include advocating campaigns against enforced disappearances and extrajudicial executions as well as fighting impunity related to them.  

Actions are encouraged to explore the links between the promotion of civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights and the phenomena of enforced disappearances and extrajudicial killings. 

 

Indicative and non-exhaustive list of activities for Lot 2:

 

Prevention

measures such as information, advocacy, campaigns and others for the signing, ratification and implementation of the relevant regional and international conventions (e.g. Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearances, Inter-American Convention on Forced Disappearance of Persons);

measures to ensure better implementation of existing national, regional and international laws or the reinforcement of legislation regarding arbitrary detentions, enforced disappearances or extra judicial killings;

training courses, education and counselling of appropriate stakeholders on detection and protection against disappearances and/or arbitrary detentions;

advocacy to prevent the practice of arbitrary detentions and enforced disappearances;

creation of early reaction mechanisms directed to the authorities against death threats, arbitrary detentions and extra judicial killings; 

support to existing mechanisms such as dedicated enquiry or case law, truth (and missing persons) commissions as well as support to monitoring and evaluation of these truth (and missing persons) commissions;

awareness raising campaigns against extrajudicial killings and/or enforced disappearances, including identification of risk groups;

 

Accountability

promotion of and/or participation in independent investigations in the case of enforced disappearances;

support to national campaigns empowering family victims' groups to engage with the appropriate duty bearers and seek for enquiry on extrajudicial killings and enforced disappearances;

support to legal actions at national, regional and international level in cases of disappearances and extrajudicial killings, including bringing cases before the relevant national, regional/international body(ies), when the criteria are met;  

advocacy for reparation programmes and guarantees of non-recurrence; 

creation of data-bases to gather biological data, such as DNA, and identification ante-mortem and post-mortem, data-bases on not identified remains and treatment of not identified bodies, as well as treatment and regulation regarding common graves;

provision of legal, medical and psychological assistance to family victims and survivors;  

protection for witnesses of enforced disappearances and/or extrajudicial killings;

Support to forensic and scientific investigations in cases of extrajudicial killings and/or enforced disappearances.

 

LOT 3: Combating forced labour AND  modern slavery .

The general objective of Lot 3 is to support actions contributing to combat forced labour in the agriculture/forestry sector with coercive recruitment practices.

This general objective is fully in line with the commitment 8.7 of the Sustainable Development Goals: "take immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labour, end modern slavery and human trafficking and secure the prohibition and elimination of the worst forms of child labour, including recruitment and use of child soldiers, and by 2025 end child labour in all its forms." It is also consistent with the fundamental ILO Conventions on the subject: the Forced Labour Convention, 1930 (N° 29) and its Protocol of 2014, the Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, 1957 (N°105) as well as the Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, 1999 (No. 182), which covers forced or compulsory labour and slavery or practices similar to slavery of children under 18 years of age. In addition to these Conventions, a number of international and regional instruments and initiatives address forced labour, as well as trafficking in human beings, slavery and institutions and practices similar to slavery.

 

The ILO Convention No 29 defines forced labour as “all work or service which is exacted from any person under the menace of any penalty and for which the said person has not offered himself voluntarily” (Article 2(1)). “All work or service” refers to all types of work, service and employment, in any activity, industry or sector, including in the informal economy. The “menace of any penalty” covers a wide range of penalties, including both penal sanctions and various forms of direct or indirect coercion, such as physical violence, psychological threats or the non-payment of wages. A penalty may also take the form of a loss of rights or privileges. The terms “offered voluntarily” refer to the free and informed consent of workers to enter into an employment relationship and their freedom to leave their employment at any time. This freedom may be denied not only by an act of the authorities, such as a statutory instrument, but also by an employer or recruiter, for example through false promises made in order to induce a worker to take a job which he or she would not otherwise have accepted.

 

For the purpose of this call, actions must focus on cases of forced labour in the agriculture and/or forestry sectors, as well as on operating at grassroots level, in particular in the most difficult situations and remote areas. These sectors have been identified in view of their high record of cases of forced labour affecting millions of men, women and children around the world.  Workers in these sectors are often low-skilled, mobile and unorganised, which makes them very vulnerable to labour exploitation and forced labour. The 11 indicators of forced labour developed by the ILO include deception, abusive working conditions, excessive overtime, withholding of wages; restriction of movement, debt bondage and retention of identity documents. Actions covering cases at the frontier between severe exploitation, trafficking in human beings, forced labour and of unacceptable forms of work in the agriculture and/or forestry sectors are therefore also eligible if duly justified in the proposal.

 

Forced labour often affects the most vulnerable and excluded groups, for example, minorities, persons affected by caste-based discrimination,  migrants, indigenous peoples, etc. Therefore, particular attention should be paid to these groups.

 

More specifically, children under the age of 18 and youth account for a large part of all victims of forced labour and need special protection measures. All actions should take into account the specific vulnerability of children and their best interest. Actions should have an integrated and comprehensive approach to children and their environment rather than being issue-based. They should be child- and gender-sensitive.

 

The specific objectives of Lot 3 are: 

a) to promote and support the ratification and effective implementation of the UN/ ILO conventions and protocols related to forced labour as well as other national or regional instruments; and/or

b) to facilitate international and regional cooperation (including judicial, police cooperation, etc. ) with the view to prevent and eliminate forced labour practices in the agriculture/forestry sector with special attention to recruitment practices and supply chains; and/or

c) to provide protective and accompanying measures for victims and/or potential victims of forced labour and their family as well as human rights defenders in the agriculture/forestry sector; and/or

d)  to ensure access to remedy for victims, accountability and prosecution of perpetrators; and/or

e) to support measures preventing forced labour and to address the systemic and structural vulnerability to forced labour and severe labour abuses of agriculture/forestry related in particular to its labour intensity and seasonal character ; and/or 

f) to support due diligence by the private and public sectors to respond to the risk of forced labour and identify, prevent, mitigate and account for how they address their adverse impacts in this field.

For the purpose of this call, actions should focus on at least one of the specific objectives mentioned above.

Indicative and non-exhaustive list of activities related to forced labour in the agriculture/forestry sectors for Lot 3:

Promoting the international and regional framework on forced labour through educational, information and/or awareness-raising programmes on the ILO fundamental Convention No 29 and its related Protocol of 2014, the Abolition of Forced Labour Convention No 105 and other relevant international and/or regional human rights instruments, in view of their adoption, ratification and  effective implementation; 

Protecting those individuals acting in challenging environments denouncing practices of forced labour ensuring their safety and further subsistence and that of their organisations and families;

Identification of forced labour victims and referral of victims to protection services;

Providing protection and accompanying measures to victims and/or potential victims of forced labour, including adequate security and privacy measures,  effective remedies such as compensation irrespective of their presence or legal status in the territory, legal assistance, interpretation facilities, training of basic skills, income generating activities, hotlines for victims, safe place for passports and belongings, access to education and to jobs, access to medical and psychological support, etc.;

Providing protection services to keep victims and witnesses and their family safe (e.g. example before during and after trials); 

Educating and informing those considered particularly vulnerable, employers and the wider public about forced labour; 

Enhancing the understanding among key actors of how to strengthen regulatory and enforcement mechanisms designed to address abusive and fraudulent recruitment practices;

Protection from abuses arising during the recruitment process;

Promoting due diligence by the public and private sectors;

Addressing root causes and factors that heighten the risks of forced labour (electronic wage payment systems, access to credit, social protection, income generating activities, vocational trainings, etc.) 

Ensuring cooperation between and among States to prevent and eliminate forced labour.

Protection from forced labour and unacceptable forms of work (such as very low or withholding of wages, excessive hours (over 17 hours per day), lack of written employment contracts, dire occupational safety and health conditions) in all segments of the supply chain in particular in the lower tiers.

Ensuring access to remedy for victims, accountability and prosecution of perpetrators. These may include provision of direct legal support to the victims and their families; support to local lawyers and organisations assisting them; case work; training sessions for lawyers, prosecutors, judges, border guards to increase their skills in dealing with forced labour cases;

Supporting the attainment of decent work and strengthen compliance with fundamental principles and rights at work in global supply chains through for example exchanges of experience and promotion of learning and policy coherence amongst stakeholders.  

 

LOT 4: Promoting and supporting the rights of persons with disabilities.

 

Representing 15% of the world’s total population, persons with disabilities face multiple barriers and discrimination in their lives and communities, leading to poverty, persistent inequalities in terms of socio-economic outcomes as well as political participation.

The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and its Optional Protocol were adopted by the UN General Assembly in 2006 and entered into force on 3 May 2008. Today, it counts with173 ratifications, including by the European Union as a regional integration organisation. 

The Convention sets out the obligations of states to promote, protect and ensure the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights by all persons with disabilities. It covers all internationally recognised civil, political social, economic and cultural rights. 

The Convention represents a paradigm shift in the treatment of persons with disabilities from a medical or charity perspective to a rights-based approach, ensuring that persons with disabilities have access to and can participate in decisions that affect their lives and seek redress for violations of their rights. 

The general objective of Lot 4 is to promote the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights and fundamental freedoms by all persons with disabilities, and to promote respect for their inherent dignity.

This general objective is fully in line with article 32 'International cooperation' of the CRPD, which commits parties to support national efforts for the realisation of the purposes and objectives of the Convention –including making a real move towards realising the paradigm shift proposed by the CRPD.

It is also consistent with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development which is underpinned by a commitment to 'leave no one behind' and which makes explicit reference to the imperative to reach persons with disabilities. 

For the purpose of this call for proposals, persons with disabilities include those who have long-term physical, intellectual or sensory impairments, which, in interaction with various barriers, may hinder their full and effective participation in society on an equal basis with others, in line with Article 1(2) of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD).

The specific objectives of Lot 4 are:

to promote and support the ratification, effective implementation and monitoring of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and its Optional Protocol, and

to foster partnerships between human rights civil society organisations and disabled peoples' organisations (DPOs) and/or civil society organisations working for persons with disabilities in order to integrate disability within their wider human rights work.

Both specific objectives need to be covered.

Indicative and non-exhaustive list of activities for Lot 4, through partnerships between human rights civil society organisations and disabled peoples' organisations (DPOs) and/or civil society organisations:

Ensuring protection against all forms of discrimination on the basis of disability (e.g. law reform, awareness raising and empowerment, victim support services, filing complaints, access to justice, effective remedies, training for judges, and data collection) for all - including those that are harder to reach (e.g. those suffering from multiple discrimination, those from the most marginalised impairment groups and those living in remote/rural areas);

Supporting collaboration between civil society organisations and public institutions for the improvement of services to persons with disabilities and their families in line with the CRPD.

Advocacy and support for the design of law and public policies and services that protect the human rights of persons with disabilities – including advancing the implementation of specific articles of the CPRD (e.g. right to access to justice, to education, to healthcare, to live independently, etc.);

Improving the capacities of disabled peoples' organisations to advocate for their rights, participate in decision-making processes and monitor the implementation of the CRPD and of the Sustainable Development Goals; 

Supporting and strengthening the functioning of the mechanisms to promote, protect and monitor the CRPD pursuant to its article 33.2 including their set up in partner countries;

Awareness-raising campaigns to foster respect for the rights and dignity of persons with disabilities; to combat stereotypes, prejudices and harmful practices relating to persons with disabilities, including those based on sex and age, in all areas of life; and to promote awareness of the capabilities and contributions of persons with disabilities. These may include strengthening the capacity of local media to deliver positive messages, training with public and private sector, etc. with involvement of disabled people's organisations.

Developing national capacities through advisory services by civil society organisations, conducting research and analysis;

Supporting the collection of appropriate information, including statistical and research data, to enable governments to formulate and implement policies leading to the fulfilment of rights of persons with disabilities. 

 

LOT 5: Supporting freedom of religion or belief

 

The general objective of Lot 5 is to promote and protect freedom of thought, conscience and religion or belief, also known as freedom of religion or belief.

In line with the 2013 EU Guidelines on Freedom of Religion or Belief, the EU "reaffirms its determination to promote, in its external human rights policy, freedom of religion or belief as a right to be exercised by everyone everywhere, based on the principles of equality, non-discrimination and universality". In doing this, the EU is guided by international human rights norms and jurisprudence, notably article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and article 18 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, which should be read in the light of the UN Human Rights Committee's General Comment 22. The latter states that "Article 18 protects theistic, non-theistic and atheistic beliefs, as well as the right not to profess any religion or belief. The terms belief and religion are to be broadly construed." In line with international standards, the EU focuses on the rights of individuals, as belief systems do not hold rights in themselves and are not protected by international human rights norms. Furthermore, the EU is impartial and is not aligned with any specific religion or belief.

More specifically, and in line with the EU Action Plan on Human Rights and Democracy 2015-2019 and its action 12 on Freedom of Religion or Belief, the EU is committed to support initiatives focusing on protecting the rights of persons belonging to religious or belief minorities, promoting intercultural and/or interreligious dialogue, and/or strengthening the role of religious actors and leaders in ensuring freedom of religion or belief. 

The specific objectives of Lot 5 are the following:

to promote everyone's freedom to believe or not to believe, without any coercion, with a particular focus on countries or situations where individuals are penalised for the act of freely choosing, changing or abandoning their religion or belief; and/or

to promote the right either alone or in community with others, in public or private, to express or manifest a religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship and observance, including artistic and cultural expressions of belief and enjoyment of cultural/religious heritage; and/or

to prevent and combat discrimination, intolerance and violence on grounds of religion or belief in all its forms, whether committed by governmental or non-governmental actors. This may include violations of freedom of religion or belief deriving e.g. from traditional practices or discriminatory legislation or practices against women and girls, and/or persons belonging to minorities or other vulnerable groups; and/or 

to enhance mutual understanding and respect between individuals of different faith or none, contributing to inclusive communities and societies accepting diversity and capable of addressing potential conflicts in a peaceful manner. 

For the purpose of this call, actions should focus on at least one of the specific objectives mentioned above. 

This lot shall not support or prioritise actions addressing other types of discrimination than those committed on the ground of religion or belief, except if these relate to multiple and intersectional discrimination. 

Indicative and non-exhaustive list of activities for Lot 5:

Awareness raising, training and/or capacity building of local civil society organisations, human rights defenders, affected individuals, groups and/or religious leaders, while ensuring inclusiveness (including participation of women, youth, persons belonging to minorities, etc.);

Activities developing literacy and capacity of the youth to develop respect for freedom of religion or belief and understanding about intercultural, interreligious and/or equal citizenship-related matters;

Provision of legal or other support, protection and assistance for human rights defenders, including academics working on freedom of religion or belief, and/or to vulnerable individuals or groups affected by violations of freedom of religion or belief;

Activities aiming at documentation of abuses and collection of disaggregated data (including sex-disaggregated); 

Advocacy and support for change of discriminatory laws and practices and for the design of legal and public policies or measures which respect international human rights standards on freedom of religion or belief; in particular the discrimination against vulnerable groups

Monitoring and reporting of the level of application of such laws and measures;

Accountability measures addressing impunity of violations (e.g. truth and reconciliation initiatives);

Advocacy and redress for and by international, regional and national human rights mechanisms and bodies;

Promoting inclusive and strategic partnerships, networking and cooperation between different stakeholders, organisations and representatives of different faiths and none, at local, regional and/or international levels, and identifying, sharing and amplifying best practices;

Implementing activities relating to promising initiatives in this field, such as the 2012 Rabat Plan of Action on the prohibition of advocacy of national, racial or religious hatred that constitutes incitement to discrimination, hostility or violence, etc.; 

Developing and implementing community-based approaches, including community education, dialogue, mediation, non-violent communication and/or other conflict transformation measures addressing entrenched ideas and practices of discriminatory and conflictual nature and aiming at change of mind-sets and behaviour;

Awareness raising and communication campaigns to inform general public about violations of freedom of religion or belief and/or promising initiatives in this field. 

 

 

 

1.3 FINANCIAL ALLOCATION PROVIDED BY THE CONTRACTING AUTHORITY 

The overall indicative amount made available under this call for proposals is EUR 25,000,000 EUR. The Contracting Authority reserves the right not to award all available funds. Equally, this amount could be increased should more funds become available.

Indicative allocation of funds for each lot: EUR 5,000,000.

If the allocation indicated for a specific lot cannot be used due to insufficient quality or number of proposals received, the Contracting Authority reserves the right to reallocate the remaining funds to (an)other lot(s).

Size of grants

Any requested EU contribution must fall between the following minimum and maximum amounts:

• minimum amount: EUR 250,000

• maximum amount: EUR 1,000,000

Any requested EU contribution under all Lots of this call for proposals must fall between the following minimum and maximum percentages of total eligible costs of the action:

• minimum percentage: 51% of the total eligible costs of the action.

• maximum percentage: 95% of the total eligible costs of the action (see also section 2.1.5). 

The balance (i.e. the difference between the total cost of action and the amount requested from the Contracting Authority) must be financed from sources other than the European Union Budget or the European Development Fund.

The requested EU contribution may cover the entire eligible costs of the action if this is deemed essential to carry it out. Note that the lead applicant can either ask for a maximum percentage of 95% or for 100% (under the conditions described above), but not for a percentage between 95 and 100%. 

If a full financing is requested, the lead applicant must justify it in Annex A.2, section 2.1. The validity of the justification provided will be examined during the evaluation procedure. The absence of any justification may lead to the rejection of the application.  

 

Rules FOR thIS call for proposalS

These guidelines set out the rules for the submission, selection and implementation of the actions financed under this call, in conformity with the Practical Guide, which is applicable to the present call (available at http://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/prag/document.do?locale=en).

Eligibility criteria

There are three sets of eligibility criteria, relating to:

the actors:

The lead applicant, i.e. the entity submitting the application form (2.1.1),

if any, its co-applicant(s) (where it is not specified otherwise the lead applicant and its co-applicant(s) are hereinafter jointly referred as "applicant(s)") (2.1.1), 

and, if any, affiliated entity(ies) to the lead applicant and/or to a co-applicant(s). (2.1.2);

the actions:

Actions for which a grant may be awarded (2.1.4);

the costs:

types of cost that may be taken into account in setting the amount of the grant (2.1.5).

 

Eligibility of applicants (i.e. lead applicant and co-applicant(s))

Lead applicant

(1) In order to be eligible for a grant, the lead applicant must:

be a legal person or an entity without legal personality or a natural person and 

be non-profit-making and

be a specific type of organisation such as: 

a) civil society organisations, including non-governmental non-profit organisations and independent political foundations, community-based organisations, indigenous peoples’ organisations, disabled persons organisations and private-sector non-profit agencies, institutions and organisations and networks thereof at local, national, regional and international level;

b) National Human Rights Institutions, Ombudspersons;

c) non-profit-making universities and

Be directly responsible for the preparation and management of the action with the co-applicant(s) and affiliated entity(ies), not acting as an intermediary.

 

For-profit organisations may also be eligible in exceptional and duly justified cases. Indeed, in situations where registration or receipt of foreign funding as non-profit organisation is made very difficult or might put the entity in danger, civil society organisations may be obliged to register as for-profit organisations to continue operating in the field of human rights. The validity of the justification will be examined by the Evaluation Committee.

International public-sector organisations set up by international agreements, specialised agencies set up by such organisations and other organisations assimilated to such international organisations (i.e. the International Committee of the Red Cross and the International Federation of National Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies) are not eligible under this call for proposals. United Nations agencies are not eligible under this call for proposals. 

No nationality restriction applies to applicants and, if any, to co-applicants and affiliated entities

 (2) Potential applicants may not participate in calls for proposals or be awarded grants if they are in any of the situations listed in section 2.3.3 of the Practical Guide;

In Annex A.2, section 5 (‘declaration by the lead applicant’), the lead applicant must declare that the lead applicant himself, the co-applicant(s) and affiliated entity(ies) are not in any of these situations.

The lead applicant may act individually or with co-applicant(s). However, to be eligible, an action must include at least one local organisation, as lead applicant or co-applicant.

A "local organisation" (with or without legal personality) must be understood as "established" in the country or one of the countries outside EU where the action is taking place. An organisation is considered "local" when its charter demonstrates that the organisation has been established by an instrument governed by the national law of the country concerned (only for entities with legal personality) and that its head office is located in that country. 

In situations where registration in the concerned country is made impossible or might put the applicant or co-applicant in danger, the applicant or co-applicant may be registered in another country. The applicant or co-applicant must prove in its statutes or through other supporting documents that the objectives and activities of the said organisation are for the benefit of the targeted country. In the absence of any justification, the proposal will be rejected. The validity of the justification provided will be examined during the evaluation procedure. Should the justification not be deemed valid, the proposal may be rejected on that sole basis.

When the lead applicant is not a local organisation, it must act with at least one local co-applicant, except when the project's activities are taking place  in a country in which local organisations cannot operate 

When the lead applicant is a regional network/platform of local organisations established in one of the countries where the action is taking place it can act without local co-applicant(s).

If awarded the grant contract, the lead applicant will become the beneficiary identified as the Coordinator in Annex E3h1 (Special Conditions). The Coordinator is the main interlocutor of the Contracting Authority. It represents and acts on behalf of any other co-beneficiary (if any) and coordinate the design and implementation of the action.

Co-applicant(s)

Co-applicants participate in designing and implementing the action, and the costs they incur are eligible in the same way as those incurred by the lead applicant. 

Co-applicants must satisfy the eligibility criteria as applicable to the lead applicant.

Co-applicants must sign the mandate in Annex A.2., section 5.2.

If awarded the grant contract, the co-applicant(s) (if any) will become beneficiary(ies) in the action (together with the Coordinator). 

 (1) In order to be eligible for a grant, the lead applicant must:

Affiliated entities

The lead applicant and its co-applicant(s) may act with affiliated entity(ies).

Only the following entities may be considered as affiliated entities to the lead applicant and/or to co-applicant(s):

Only entities having a structural link with the applicants (i.e. the lead applicant or a co-applicant), in particular a legal or capital link.

This structural link encompasses mainly two notions:

(i) Control, as defined in Directive 2013/34/EU on the annual financial statements, consolidated financial statements and related reports of certain types of undertakings:

Entities affiliated to applicant may hence be:

Entities directly or indirectly controlled by an applicant (daughter companies or first-tier subsidiaries). They may also be entities controlled by an entity controlled by an applicant (granddaughter companies or second-tier subsidiaries) and the same applies to further tiers of control;

Entities directly or indirectly controlling the applicant (parent companies). Likewise, they may be entities controlling an entity controlling the applicant;

Entities under the same direct or indirect control as the applicant (sister companies).

(ii) Membership, i.e. the applicant is legally defined as a e.g. network, federation, association in which the proposed affiliated entities also participate or  the applicant participates in the same entity (e.g. network, federation, association) as the proposed affiliated entities.

 

The structural link shall as a general rule be neither limited to the action nor established for the sole purpose of its implementation. This means that the link would exist independently of the award of the grant; it should exist before the call for proposals and remain valid after the end of the action.

By way of exception, an entity may be considered as affiliated to an applicant even if it has a structural link specifically established for the sole purpose of the implementation of the action in the case of so-called “sole applicants” or “sole beneficiaries”.  A sole applicant or a sole beneficiary is a legal entity formed by several entities (a group of entities) which together comply with the criteria for being awarded the grant. For example, an association is formed by its members.

What is not an affiliated entity? 

 

The following are not considered entities affiliated to an applicant:

Entities that have entered into a (procurement) contract or subcontract with an applicant, act as concessionaires or delegatees for public services for an applicant,

Entities that receive financial support from an applicant,

Entities that cooperate on a regular basis with an applicant on the basis of a memorandum of understanding or share some assets,

Entities that have signed a consortium agreement under the grant contract (unless this consortium agreement leads to the creation of a "sole applicant" as described above).

 

How to verify the existence of the required link with an applicant?

 

The affiliation resulting from control may in particular be proved on the basis of the consolidated accounts of the group of entities the applicant and its proposed affiliates belong to.

The affiliation resulting from membership may in particular be proved on the basis of the statutes or equivalent act establishing the entity (network, federation, association) which the applicant constitutes or in which the applicant participates.

If the applicants are awarded a grant contract, their affiliated entity(ies) will not become beneficiary(ies) of the action and signatory(ies) of the grant contract. However, they will participate in the design and  in the implementation of the action and the costs they incur (including those incurred for implementation contracts and financial support to third parties) may be accepted as eligible costs, provided they comply with all the relevant rules already applicable to the beneficiary(ies) under the grant contract.

Affiliated entity(ies) must satisfy the same eligibility criteria as the lead applicant and the co-applicant(s).  They must sign the affiliated entity(ies) statement in Annex A.2., section 5.3.

Note that the fact of having a structural link with the lead applicant does not prevent an organisation from being co-applicant in the partnership. It is the lead applicant's decision to define the role of the actors composing its partnership and implementing the action: co-applicants or affiliated entities.

 

Associates and Contractors

The following entities are not applicants nor affiliated entities and do not have to sign the "mandate for co-applicant(s)" or "affiliated entities' statement":

Associates

Other organisations or individuals may be involved in the action. Such associates play a real role in the action but may not receive funding from the grant, with the exception of per diem or travel costs. Associates do not have to meet the eligibility criteria referred to in section 2.1.1. Associates must be mentioned in Annex A.2., section 4 — ‘Associates participating in the action’.

Contractors

The beneficiaries and their affiliated entities are permitted to award contracts. Associates or affiliated entity(ies) cannot be also contractors in the project. Contractors are subject to the procurement rules set out in Annex IV to the standard grant contract.

Eligible actions: actions for which an application may be made

Definition

An action is composed of a set of activities.

Duration

The initial planned duration of an action may not be lower than 30 nor exceed 36 months.

Sectors or themes

The specific sectors or themes to which the actions must relate are described for each lot under section 1.2 above.

Location 

Actions must take place in at least two (2) countries outside the European Union. Nevertheless, punctual activities may, if duly justified in the description of the action, take place in EU countries when they are directly related to situations arising in third countries and for the benefit of those countries, e.g. a seminar or conference, a visit to the European Institutions, an opening or closing of a campaign in an EU Member State, a specific exhibition or other similar single events. These reasons will be examined during the evaluation process.

In particular, actions may take place:

a) in challenging environments (e.g. where there is less or no room for dialogue with national authorities; where the interventions may give the opportunity to set precedents; where expectations regarding final impact must be more modest; where no human rights reports are submitted to UN instances; where UN or other regional human rights bodies' recommendations are not given follow-up; 

b) in countries where a clear impact can be reached at the end of the action (e.g. where law change is feasible; where there is openness for dialogue with authorities; where it is possible to implement training courses for officials; where recommendations from the UN and/or other regional human rights bodies are followed, etc.)

 

Types of action and activity

The types of action and the indicative and non-exhaustive list of activities which may be financed under this call are described for each lot under section 1.2 above. 

A Rights-Based Approach, encompassing all human rights, for EU development cooperation

The following elements are necessary in order to apply a rights-based approach to development:

Assessment and analysis in order to identify the human rights claims of rights-holders and the corresponding human rights obligations of duty-bearers as well as the immediate, underlying, and structural causes of the non-realization of rights.

Programmes and projects assess the capacity of rights-holders to claim their rights and of duty-bearers to fulfil their obligations. They then develop strategies to build these capacities.

Programmes monitor and evaluate both outcomes and processes guided by the following human rights principles briefly explained and exemplified as follows;

Applying all rights (legality, universality and indivisibility of human rights) – Human rights are universal, inalienable and indivisible – all human rights, whether economic, political, civil, cultural and social, are of equal validity and importance. 

Make the link to the human rights system and use its products (reports, concluding observations, recommendations, etc.) to inform activities: How are human rights standards from treaties or laws – and related recommendations – identified in strategies and used to advance the intended project and programme outcomes (or how could they be)?

Participation and access to the decision making process –Participation is the basis for active citizenship. Active, free and meaningful participation is both a means and an end in itself. 

Make sure that participation is more than consultation or a technical step in project preparation. Is there meaningful participation of rights holders and opportunities for them to influence strategies and the intended project and programme outcomes (before/during/after the project activities)?

Non-discrimination and equal access –activities have to prioritise the most marginalised groups and avoid contributing to established patterns of discrimination. 

Who are the rights holders? Have they been taken into account in designing the contribution? Is there unjustified formal or de facto restriction or exclusion of particular groups from access to resources, services or participation in decision-making processes? Have efforts been made to include the most marginalised? Is the development intervention accessible for persons with disabilities (in line with the EU's obligation under Article 32 Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities CRPD))?

Accountability and access to the rule of law –activities have to promote accessible, transparent and effective mechanisms of accountability Who are the duty bearers ? Which powers and capacities do they have (and not have) to advance their human rights obligations? 

Transparency and access to information –activities have to be transparent, with information available in accessible formats (for example: local languages, etc.). Transparency is paramount for ensuring the application of the other working principles – without transparency it is not possible to achieve accountability and participation will not be meaningful. 

Is information available in an accessible way to all stakeholders (people that are involved in the activities) concerned? Are rights holders able to participate in meetings and processes where issues which affect them are discussed?

The working principles mentioned above should be implemented as appropriate in relation to the given project.

In any case, the following types of action are not eligible:

• actions concerned only or mainly with individual sponsorships for participation in workshops, seminars, conferences and congresses;

• actions concerned only or mainly with individual scholarships for studies or training courses;

• actions concerned only with one-off conferences. Conferences can only be funded if they form part of a wider range of activities to be implemented during the project;

• action where financial support to third parties is the main purpose of the action;

• actions supporting political parties;

• actions including proselytism.

Financial support to third parties  

Applicants may propose financial support to third parties in order to help achieve the objectives of the action. Additional information can be found in Annex X of the Guidelines for Applicants.

Financial support to third parties is an effective way of reaching out to more and smaller/grass-roots CSOs which do not have the capacity to apply for regular European Commission Calls for Proposals. 

Third parties are neither affiliated entity(ies) nor co-applicants nor associates nor contractors.

This scheme allows the support to organisations with lower grant amounts through calls for proposals or other forms of financial support (e.g. scholarship, financial support to Human Rights Defenders, operating costs, etc.); and through a procedure that may be less technically demanding and more tailor-made to grass-roots organisations.

It is up to the Applicant (and the co-applicant(s), if applicable) to define in the application the selection procedures for the recipients of financial support to third parties.

In particular, financial support to third parties is strongly encouraged for proposals submitted by non-local organisations as lead applicants. 

The maximum amount of financial support per third party is EUR 60,000 but can be lower depending on a need assessment by the lead applicant.

In compliance with the present guidelines and notably of any conditions or restrictions in this section, the lead applicant should define mandatorily in section 2.1.1 of the grant application form (Annex A.2): 

(i) the objectives and results to be obtained with the financial support 

(ii) the different types of activities eligible for financial support, on the basis of a fixed list 

(iii) the types of persons or categories of persons which may receive financial support  

(iv) the criteria for selecting these entities and giving the financial support  

(v) the criteria for determining the exact amount of financial support for each third entity 

(vi) the maximum amount which may be given

(vii) system of control set up to verify the eligibility of costs

The quality and integration of the financial support to third parties (including in the Budget) will be taken into account at all stages of technical evaluation and specifically in section 1.3 of the Concept Note Evaluation Grid and in section 3.1 of the Full Application Evaluation Grid. 

Please refer to Annex X for additional information on Financial Support to Third Parties.

Visibility

The applicants must take all necessary steps to publicise the fact that the European Union has financed or co-financed the action. As far as possible, actions that are wholly or partially funded by the European Union must incorporate information and communication activities designed to raise the awareness of specific or general audiences of the reasons for the action and the EU support for the action in the country or region concerned, as well as the results and the impact of this support.

Applicants must comply with the objectives and priorities and guarantee the visibility of the EU financing (see the Communication and Visibility Manual for EU external actions specified and published by the European Commission at https://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/communication-and-visibility-manual-eu-external-actions_en).

Number of applications and grants per applicants / affiliated entities

An organisation may not be participating more than once in the present call for proposals as lead applicant or co-applicant. Should this be the case, the EC will only consider the first proposal arrived (based on the date and hour of submission) and any other additional proposal will be rejected. It is the responsibility of each lead applicant to verify that its co-applicants are not involved as lead applicant or co-applicant in other proposals.

Eligibility of costs: costs that can be included 

Only ‘eligible costs’ can be covered by a grant. The categories of costs that are eligible and non-eligible are indicated below. The budget is both a cost estimate and an overall ceiling for ‘eligible costs’. 

The reimbursement of eligible costs may be based on any or a combination of the following forms:

actual costs incurred by the beneficiary(ies) and affiliated entity(ies)

one or more simplified cost options.

Simplified cost options may take the form of:

unit costs: covering all or certain specific categories of eligible costs which are clearly identified in advance by reference to an amount per unit.

lump sums: covering in global terms all or certain specific categories of eligible costs which are clearly identified in advance.

flat-rate financing: covering specific categories of eligible costs which are clearly identified in advance by applying a percentage fixed ex ante.

The amounts or rates have to be based on estimates using objective data such as statistical data or any other objective means or with reference to certified or auditable historical data of the applicants or the affiliated entity(ies). The methods used to determine the amounts or rates of unit costs, lump sums or flat-rates must comply with the criteria established in Annex K, and especially ensure that the costs correspond fairly to the actual costs incurred by the beneficiary(ies) and affiliated entity(ies), are in line with their accounting practices, no profit is made and the costs are not already covered by other sources of funding (no double funding). Refer to Annex K for directions and a checklist of controls to assess the minimum necessary conditions that provide reasonable assurance for the acceptance of the proposed amounts.

Applicants proposing this form of reimbursement, must clearly indicate in worksheet no.1 of Annex B, each heading/item  of eligible costs concerned by this type of financing, i.e. add the reference in capital letters to "UNIT COST" (per month/flight etc), "LUMPSUM" or "FLAT RATE" in the Unit column. (see example in Annex K)

Additionally in Annex B, in the second column of worksheet no.2, "Justification of the estimated costs" per each of the corresponding budget item or heading applicants must:

describe the information and methods used to establish the amounts of unit costs, lump sums and/or flat-rates, to which costs they refer, etc.

clearly explain the formulas for calculation of the final eligible amount

identify the beneficiary who will use the simplified cost option (in case of affiliated entity, specify first the beneficiary), in order to verify the maximum amount per each beneficiary (which includes if applicable simplified cost options of its affiliated entity(ies))

At contracting phase, the Contracting Authority decides whether to accept the proposed amounts or rates on the basis of the provisional budget submitted by the applicants, by analysing factual data of grants carried out by the applicants or of similar actions and by performing checks established by Annex K. 

The total amount of financing on the basis of simplified cost options that can be authorised by the Contracting Authority for any of the applicants individually (including simplified cost options proposed by their own affiliated entities) cannot exceed EUR 60 000 (the indirect costs are not taken into account). 

Recommendations to award a grant are always subject to the condition that the checks preceding the signing of the grant contract do not reveal problems requiring changes to the budget (such as arithmetical errors, inaccuracies, unrealistic costs and ineligible costs). The checks may give rise to requests for clarification and may lead the Contracting Authority to impose modifications or reductions to address such mistakes or inaccuracies. It is not possible to increase the grant or the percentage of EU co-financing as a result of these corrections.

It is therefore in the applicants' interest to provide a realistic and cost-effective budget

The simplified cost option may also take the form of an apportionment of Field Office's costs.

Field Office means a local infrastructure set up in one of the countries where the action is implemented or a nearby country. (Where the action is implemented in several third countries there can be more than one Field Office). That may consist of costs for local office as well as human resources. 

A Field Office may be exclusively dedicated to the action financed (or co-financed) by the EU or may be used for other projects implemented in the partner country. When the Field Office is used for other projects, only the portion of capitalised and operating costs which corresponds to the duration of the action and the rate of actual use of the field office for the purpose of the action may be declared as eligible direct costs.

The portion of costs attributable to the action can be declared as actual costs or determined by the beneficiary(ies) on the basis of a simplified allocation method (apportionment).

The method of allocation has to be:

1. Compliant with the beneficiary's usual accounting and management practices and applied in a consistent manner regardless of the source of funding and 

2. Based on an objective, fair and reliable allocation keys. (Please refer to Annex K to have examples of acceptable allocation keys).

A description prepared by the entity of the allocation method used to determine Field Office's costs in accordance with the entity's usual cost accounting and management practices and explaining how the method satisfy condition 1 and 2 indicated above, has to be presented in a separate sheet and annexed to the Budget.

The method will be assessed and accepted by the evaluation committee and the Contracting Authority at contracting phase. The applicant is invited to submit (where relevant) the list of contracts to which the methodology proposed had been already applied and for which proper application was confirmed by an expenditure verification. 

At the time of carrying out the expenditure verifications, the auditors will check if the costs reported are compliant with the method described by the beneficiary(ies) and accepted by the Contracting Authority.

Adequate record and documentation must be kept by the beneficiary(ies) to prove the compliance of the simplified allocation method used with the conditions set out above. Upon request of the beneficiary(ies), this compliance can be assessed and approved ex-ante by an independent external auditor. In such a case, the simplified allocation method will be automatically accepted by the evaluation committee and it will not be challenged ex post.

When costs are declared on the basis of such allocation method the amount charged to the action is to be indicated in the column "TOTAL COSTS" and the mention "APPORTIONMENT" is to be indicated in the column "units" (under budget heading 1 (Human resources) and 4 (Local Office) of the Budget).

It has to be noted that the EUR 60.000 limit, otherwise applicable to costs declared on the basis of simplified cost options, is not relevant for costs declared following apportionment of Field Offices. 

Eligible direct costs

To be eligible under this call for proposals, costs must comply with the provisions of Article 14 of the General Conditions to the standard grant contract (see Annex G of the guidelines).

Contingency reserve

The budget may include a contingency reserve not exceeding 5 % of the estimated direct eligible costs. It can only be used with the prior written authorisation of the Contracting Authority.

Eligible indirect costs

The indirect costs incurred in carrying out the action may be eligible for flat-rate funding, but the total must not exceed 7 % of the estimated total eligible direct costs. Indirect costs are eligible provided that they do not include costs assigned to another budget heading in the standard grant contract. The lead applicant may be asked to justify the percentage requested before the grant contract is signed. However, once the flat rate has been fixed in the Special Conditions of the grant contract, no supporting documents need to be provided.

If any of the applicants or affiliated entity(ies) is in receipt of an operating grant financed by the EU, it may not claim indirect costs on its incurred costs within the proposed budget for the action.

Contributions in kind

Contributions in kind mean the provision of goods or services to a beneficiaries or affiliated entities free of charge by a third party. As contributions in kind do not involve any expenditure for beneficiaries or affiliated entities, they are not eligible costs. 

Contributions in kind may not be treated as co-financing

However, if the description of the action as proposed includes contributions in kind, the contributions have to be made.

Ineligible costs

The following costs are not eligible:

debts and debt service charges (interest);

provisions for losses or potential future liabilities;

costs declared by the beneficiary(ies) and financed by another action or work programme receiving a European Union (including through EDF) grant;

purchases of land or buildings, except where necessary for the direct implementation of the action, in which case ownership must be transferred, in accordance with Article 7.5 of the General Conditions of the standard grant contract, at the latest at the end of the action;

currency exchange losses;

credit to third parties.

salary costs of the personnel of national administrations (except for applicants, co-applicants or affiliated entities with a status of National Human Rights Institution or Ombudsperson). 

How to apply and the procedures to follow

To apply for this call for proposals the lead applicants need to:

Provide information about the organisations involved in the action. Please note that the registration of this data in PADOR is obligatory for this call for proposals:

Concept note step: Registration is obligatory for lead applicants.

Full application step: Registration is obligatory for co-applicant(s) and affiliated entity(ies). Lead applicants must make sure that their PADOR profile is up to date. 

Provide information about the action in the documents listed below under sections 2.2.1 (concept note) and 2.2.5 (full application). Please note that online submission via PROSPECT is obligatory for this call.

PADOR is an on-line database in which organisations register and update information concerning their entity. Organisations registered in PADOR get a unique ID (EuropeAid ID) which they must mention in their application. PADOR is accessible via the website: http://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/pador_en 

It is strongly recommended to register in PADOR well in advance and not to wait until the last minute before the deadline to submit your application in PROSPECT. 

If it is impossible to register online in PADOR for technical reasons, the applicants and/or affiliated entity(ies) must complete the ‘PADOR off-line form attached to these guidelines. This form must be sent together with the application, by the submission deadline (see sections 2.2.3 and 2.2.7). 

Before starting using PADOR and PROSPECT, please read the user guides available on the website. All technical questions related the use of these systems should be addressed to the IT helpdesk at EuropeAid-IT-support@ec.europa.eu via the online support form in PROSPECT.

 Concept note content  

Applications must be submitted in accordance with the concept note instructions in the grant application form annexed to these guidelines (Annex A.1).  Applicants must apply in English, French or Spanish

Please note that:

1. In the concept note lead applicants must provide only an estimate of the requested EU contribution, as well as an indicative percentage of this contribution in relation to the total eligible costs of the action. A detailed budget is to be submitted only by lead applicants invited to submit a full application in the second phase.

2. The elements outlined in the concept note may not be modified in the full application form. The EU contribution may not vary from the initial estimate by more than 20 %. Lead applicants are free to adapt the requested EU contribution as a percentage of the total eligible costs within the minimum and maximum amounts and percentages provided in section 1.3. The lead applicant may replace a co-applicant or an affiliated entity only in duly justified cases (e.g. bankruptcy of initial co-applicant or affiliated entity). In this case the new co-applicant/affiliated entity must be of a similar nature as the initial one. The lead applicant may adjust the duration of the action if unforeseen circumstances outside the scope of the applicants have taken place following the submission of the concept note and require such adaptation (risk of action not being carried out). In such cases the duration must remain within the limits imposed by the guidelines for applicants. An explanation/justification of the relevant replacement/adjustment shall be included in section 2.1.1 (iv) of the grant application form.

Own contributions by the applicants can be replaced by other donors' contributions at any time.

3. Only the concept note form will be evaluated. It is therefore of utmost importance that this document contains all relevant information concerning the action. No additional annexes should be sent.

Any error or major discrepancy related to the concept note instructions may lead to the rejection of the concept note.

Clarifications will only be requested when information provided is not sufficient to conduct an objective assessment. 

Where and how to send concept notes

The concept note together with the declaration by the lead applicant (Annex A.1 section 2) must be submitted online via PROSPECT https://webgate.ec.europa.eu/europeaid/prospect following the instructions given in the PROSPECT user manual.

Upon submission of a concept note online, the lead applicant will receive an automatic confirmation of receipt in its PROSPECT profile. 

 

If it is impossible for lead applicants to submit their concept note online via PROSPECT for technical reasons, they must send their proposal in a sealed envelope and attach the concept note together with the declaration by the lead applicant (Annex A.1  section 2). In particular, the lead applicant must send, in a sealed envelope as described below the following items:

 a. One original of the concept note. The signed declaration by the lead applicant (Annex A.1 section 2) must be printed and stapled separately and enclosed in the envelope;

b. An electronic version (e.g. CD-Rom) of the items under point (a). The electronic file must contain exactly the same application as the paper version enclosed. 

The outer envelope must bear the reference and the title of the Call for Proposals, the lot number and title, the full name and address of the applicant, and the words "Not to be opened before the opening session".

Please note that "technical reasons" should be understood ONLY in a situation when PROSPECT is not responding. Paper submission when PROSPECT is working may lead to the rejection of the application.

The validity of the submission off-line will be examined by the Evaluation Committee. 

Submission off-line for technical reasons should not be mixed up with paper submission for confidentiality reasons (please see below).

NB: In exceptional cases, when the applicants do not find it appropriate to send the Concept Note through PROSPECT due to security and confidentiality concerns of the actors involved, Concept Notes can instead be submitted in a sealed envelope by registered mail with delivery confirmation, private courier service or by hand-delivery at the address below (a signed and dated acknowledgement of receipt will be given by the European Commission). The fact that the proposal is sent due to security and confidentiality concerns should also be made clear in the envelope. When the organizations involved in the proposal do not find it appropriate to register in PADOR online due to security and confidentiality concerns, they must complete the ‘PADOR off-line form attached to these guidelines. This form must be sent together with the application, by the submission deadline (see sections 2.2.3 and 2.2.7.). 

To reduce expense and waste, we strongly recommend that you do not use plastic folders or dividers. Please also use double-sided printing if possible.

Postal address

European Commission
Directorate-General for International Cooperation and Development
Unit DEVCO B6 Finance and Contracts

Attn. Head of Unit L-41 03/110 

Avenue du Bourget, 1
B-1049 Brussels
BELGIUM

Address for hand delivery or by private courier service

European Commission
Directorate-General for International Cooperation and Development
Unit DEVCO B6 Finance and Contracts

Attn. Head of Unit L-41 03/110 

Avenue du Bourget, 1
Central Mail Service
Avenue du Bourget, 1
B-1140 Brussels (Evere)
BELGIUM

Concept notes sent by any other means (e.g. by fax or by e-mail) or delivered to other addresses will be rejected. 

Please note that incomplete concept notes may be rejected. Lead applicants are advised to verify that their concept note is complete by using the checklist for concept note (Annex A.1, Instructions).

Deadline for submission of concept notes 

The deadline for the submission of concept notes is on the 09/11/2017 at 16:00 (Brussels date and time).  In order to convert this deadline to local time you can use any online time converter tool that takes into account timezones and winter/summer time changes (example available here) The lead applicant is strongly advised not to wait until the last day to submit its concept note, since heavy Internet traffic or a fault with the Internet connection (including electricity failure, etc.) could lead to difficulties in submission. The Contracting Authority cannot be held responsible for any delay due to such afore-mentioned difficulties. 

In the exceptional case of submission by post or by hand delivery (see section 2.2.2), the date of submission is evidenced by the date of dispatch, the postmark or the date of the deposit slip. In the case of hand-deliveries, the deadline for receipt is at 16h00 local time (Brussels) as evidenced by the signed and dated receipt.

Any concept note submitted after the deadline will be rejected.

However, for reasons of administrative efficiency, the Contracting Authority may also reject any concept note sent in due time but received after the effective date of approval of the concept note evaluation (see indicative calendar under section 2.5.2).

Further information about concept notes

Questions may be sent by e-mail no later than 21 days before the deadline for the submission of concept notes to the address(es) below, indicating clearly the reference of the call for proposals:

E-mail address: EuropeAid-155232@ec.europa.eu

The Contracting Authority has no obligation to provide clarifications to questions received after this date.

Replies will be given no later than 11 days before the deadline for submission of concept notes. 

To ensure equal treatment of applicants, the contracting authority cannot give a prior opinion on the eligibility of lead applicants, co-applicants, affiliated entity(ies), an action or specific activities.

No individual replies will be given to questions. All questions and answers as well as other important notices to applicants during the course of the evaluation procedure will be published on the EuropeAid website https://webgate.ec.europa.eu/europeaid/online-services/index.cfm?do=publi.welcome, as appropriate. It is therefore advisable to consult the abovementioned website regularly in order to be informed of the questions and answers published.

All questions related to registration in PADOR or the online submission via PROSPECT should be addressed to the IT helpdesk at EuropeAid-IT-support@ec.europa.eu via the online support form in PROSPECT: Please note that the working languages of the IT support are: English, French and Spanish. Therefore users are invited to send their questions in English, French or Spanish should they wish to benefit from an optimum response time.

Full applications 

Lead applicants invited to submit a full application following pre-selection of their concept note must do so using the full application form annexed to these guidelines (Annex A.2). 

Applications must be submitted in accordance with the full application instructions at the end of Annex A.2. Lead applicants must submit their full applications in the same language as their concept notes. 

Please note that:

1. The elements outlined in the concept note cannot be modified by the lead applicant in the full application form. The EU contribution may not vary from the initial estimate by more than 20 %, although lead applicants are free to adapt the percentage of co-financing required within the minimum and maximum amount and percentages of co-financing, as laid down in these guidelines under section 1.3. The lead applicant may replace a co-applicant or an affiliated entity only in duly justified cases (e.g. bankruptcy of initial co-applicant or affiliated entity). In this case the new co-applicant/affiliated entity must be of a similar nature as the initial one. The lead applicant may adjust the duration of the action if unforeseen circumstances outside the scope of the applicants have taken place following the submission of the concept note and require such adaptation (risk of action not being carried out). An explanation/justification of the relevant replacement/adjustment shall be included in section 2.1.1 of the grant application form.

2. A copy of the lead applicant’s accounts of the latest financial year (the profit and loss account and the balance sheet for the last financial year for which the accounts have been closed) must be uploaded in PADOR by the full application deadline. A copy of the latest account is neither required from (if any) the co-applicant(s) nor from (if any) affiliated entity(ies)).

3.  Only the full application form and the published annexes which have to be filled in (budget, logical framework) will be transmitted to the evaluators (and assessors, if used). It is therefore of utmost importance that these documents contain ALL the relevant information concerning the action. No additional annexes should be sent.

Any error or any major inconsistency related to the full application instructions  (e.g. if the amounts in the budget worksheets are inconsistent) may lead to the rejection of the application.

Clarifications will only be requested when information provided is unclear and thus prevents the Contracting Authority from conducting an objective assessment.

Where and how to send full applications 

Full application forms together with the budget, the logical framework and the declaration by the lead applicant must be submitted online via PROSPECT https://webgate.ec.europa.eu/ europeaid/prospect following the instructions given in the users’ manual.

Upon submission of the full application online, the lead applicants will receive an automatic confirmation of receipt in their PROSPECT profile. 

(a) If the lead applicant submitted the concept note by post / hand delivery (see section 2.2.3) it must send the full application by the same means (by post or hand delivery). 

(b) If the lead applicant submitted the concept note online via PROSPECT but it is technically impossible for the organisation to submit the full application online:

 In the above two cases the lead applicant must send by post the application, i.e the full application form, the budget, the logical framework and the declaration by the lead applicant. The lead applicant must send, in a sealed envelope as described below, the following items:

a. One original signed copy of the full application form, the budget and the logical framework. The declaration by the lead applicant (Annex A.2, section 5) must be printed and stapled separately and enclosed in the envelope

b. An electronic version  (CD-Rom of the items under point (a). The electronic file must contain exactly the same application as the paper version enclosed. 

To reduce expense and waste, we strongly recommend that you use only paper for your file (no plastic folders or dividers). Please also use double-sided printing if possible

Applications must be submitted in a sealed envelope by registered mail, private courier service or by hand-delivery (a signed and dated certificate of receipt will be given to the deliverer) to the address below. Where lead applicants send several applications (if allowed to do so by the guidelines of the call), each one must be sent separately:

Postal address

European Commission
Directorate-General for International Cooperation and Development
Unit DEVCO B6 Finance and Contracts

Attn. Head of Unit L-41 03/110 

Avenue du Bourget, 1
B-1049 Brussels
BELGIUM

Address for hand delivery or by private courier service

European Commission
Directorate-General for International Cooperation and Development
Unit DEVCO B6 Finance and Contracts

Attn. Head of Unit L-41 03/110 

Avenue du Bourget, 1
Central Mail Service
Avenue du Bourget, 1
B-1140 Brussels (Evere)
BELGIUM

The envelope must bear the reference number and the title of the call for proposals, together with the number and title of the lot, the full name and address of the lead applicant, and the words ‘Not to be opened before the opening session’. 

Applications sent by any other means (e.g. by fax or by e-mail) or delivered to other addresses will be rejected. Hand-written applications will not be accepted.

Please note that incomplete applications may be rejected. Lead applicants are advised to verify that their application is complete using the checklist (Annex A.2, Instructions).

 

Deadline for submission of full applications 

The deadline for the submission of full applications will be indicated in the letter sent to the lead applicants whose application has been pre-selected. This letter will appear online automatically in the PROSPECT profile of the lead applicant. Lead applicants who, in exceptional cases (see section 2.2.6), had to submit their application by post or hand-delivery, will receive the letter by email or by post if no e-mail address was provided.

Lead applicants are strongly advised not to wait until the last day to submit their full applications, since heavy Internet traffic or a fault with the Internet connection (including electricity failure, etc.) could lead to difficulties in submission. The Contracting Authority cannot be held responsible for any delay due to such afore-mentioned difficulties. 

In the case of submission by post, (see section 2.2.6), the date of submission is evidenced by the date of dispatch, the postmark or the date of the deposit slip. In the case of hand-deliveries, the deadline for receipt is at 16:00 Brussels time as evidenced by the signed and dated receipt.

Any application submitted after the deadline will be rejected. 

However, for reasons of administrative efficiency, the Contracting Authority may also reject any full application sent in due time but received after the effective date of approval of the full application evaluation (see indicative calendar under section 2.5.2).  

Further information about full applications 

Questions may be sent by e-mail no later than 21 days before the deadline for the submission of full applications to the addresses listed below, indicating clearly the reference of the call for proposals:

E-mail address: EuropeAid-155232@ec.europa.eu 

The Contracting Authority has no obligation to provide clarifications to questions received after this date.

Replies will be given no later than 11 days before the deadline for the submission of applications. 

To ensure equal treatment of applicants, the Contracting Authority cannot give a prior opinion on the eligibility of lead applicants, co-applicants, affiliated entity(ies), or an action.

No individual replies will be given to questions. All questions and answers as well as other important notices to applicants during the course of the evaluation procedure, will be published on the EuropeAid website https://webgate.ec.europa.eu/europeaid/online-services/index.cfm?do=publi.welcome, as appropriate. It is therefore advisable to consult the abovementioned website regularly in order to be informed of the questions and answers published.

All questions related to registration in PADOR or the online submission via PROSPECT should be addressed to the IT helpdesk via the online support form in PROSPECT. Please note that the working languages of the IT support are: English French and Spanish. Therefore users are invited to send their questions in English, French or Spanish should they wish to benefit from an optimum response time.

 

Evaluation and selection of applications

Applications will be examined and evaluated by the Contracting Authority with the possible assistance of external assessors. All applications will be assessed according to the following steps and criteria.

If the examination of the application reveals that the proposed action does not meet the eligibility criteria stated in section 2.1, the application will be rejected on this sole basis.

 

STEP 1: OPENING & ADMINISTRATIVE CHECKS AND CONCEPT NOTE EVALUATION

During the opening and administrative check (including the eligibility check of the action) the following will be assessed:

If the deadline has been met. Otherwise, the application will be automatically rejected.

If the concept note satisfies all the criteria specified in the checklist in the instructions included in Annex A.1. This includes also an assessment of the eligibility of the action.  If any of the requested information is missing or is incorrect, the application may be rejected on that sole basis and the application will not be evaluated further.

The concept notes that pass this check will be evaluated on the relevance and design of the proposed action.

The concept notes will receive an overall score out of 50 in line with the evaluation grid below. The evaluation will also check the compliance with the instructions on how to complete the concept note (Annex A.1).

The evaluation criteria are divided into headings and subheadings. Each subheading will be given a score between 1 and 5 as follows: 1 = very poor; 2 = poor; 3 = adequate; 4 = good; 5 = very good.

 

Section

1. Relevance of the action

1.1. How relevant is the proposal to the objectives and priorities of the Call for Proposals?

Includes the evaluation of the priority to proposals submitted by local organisations or regional networks/platforms of local organisations established in one of the countries where the action is taking place  

Maximum Score 5x2**

 

1.2. How relevant to the particular needs and constraints of the target country(ies) or region(s) is the proposal (including synergy with other EU initiatives and avoidance of duplication)?

Includes the evaluation of the Rights Based approach Methodology

Maximum Score 5x2**

 

1.3. How clearly defined and strategically chosen are those involved (final beneficiaries, target groups)? Have their needs been clearly defined and does the proposal address them appropriately?*

Includes the evaluation of the methodology for Financial Support to Third Parties (cfr: section 2.4)

Maximum Score 5

 

1.4. Does the proposal contain specific added-value elements, such as environmental issues, promotion of gender equality and equal opportunities, rights of disabled people (including accessibility), rights of minorities and rights of indigenous peoples, or innovation and best practices and the other additional elements indicated under 1.2. of these guidelines?

Maximum Score 5

 

2. Design of the action

2.1. How coherent is the overall design of the action? In particular, does it reflect the analysis of the problems involved, take into account external factors and relevant stakeholders?

Maximum Score 5x2**

 

2.2. Is the action feasible and consistent in relation to the objectives and expected results?

Maximum Score 5x2**

 

Maximum total score 50

 

**these scores are multiplied by 2 because of their importance

Concept notes with a score lower than 30 will be rejected.

Concept notes that reach the above threshold will be ranked by score. The highest scoring applications will be pre-selected until the limit of at least 200% of the available budget for this call for proposals is reached.

The amount of requested contributions of each concept note will be based on the indicative financial envelopes for each lot, where relevant.

Lead applicants will receive a letter indicating the reference number of their application and the respective results. This letter will automatically appear online in the PROSPECT profile of the lead applicant. Lead applicants who, in exceptional cases (see section 2.2), had to submit their application by post or hand-delivery will receive the letter by email or by post if no e-mail address was provided.

The pre-selected lead applicants will subsequently be invited to submit full applications.

 

(TRUNCATED please visit the public link of the call)



Public link:   Only for registered users


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